Sri Lanka’s local adictive “hard” drug


This photo is a close up of Sri Lanka’s indigenous answer to “hard” drugs. Yet it’s completely legal. There are no withdrawal symptoms. The high lasts for quite a while. Cravings will not make you want to kill anyone. Taken in small doses over a long period, it is sure to kill you. So will crossing the street too often or getting on a bus.

It’s fried spicy Anacardium occidentale nuts (cashew to those in the decadent west). Prepared in the lethal addictive concussion known as Mccurrie’s Caju Badum. I intentionally avoid knowing where to buy it. I only eat it around this time each year. When sympathetic relatives drop off a pack or two. Supposedly as a “treat” half way between new year’s and the food orgies of Sri Lanka’s end of year pre-sex party season.

As you can see by the close up, there’s more to Mccurrie’s Caju Badum than just fried nuts. A glance and a sniff (in lieu of chemical analysis) indicates a will power destroying mix of spices and oil. I doubt any of it is healthy. The oil alone must be an artery clogger that takes your cholesterol level off the charts. Naturally if you worry about such things you shouldn’t be even touching this stuff. If eaten at a mass level, I would claim its a threat to national health. Like arrack, Sri Lankan driving, the nation’s politicians, religious beliefs, astrological practices and all our “traditional” sweets.

You can eat Mccurrie’s Caju Badum with anything. Yet I doubt it will eliminate the oddly stringy taste of human meat (but what do I know – I’m a vegetarian). For my late night Caju Badum binge session I prefer it neat. Which reminds me that it is an ideal “bite” for boozy hang out with the machans. The only way I can stop eating it is when it runs out. Given the rate at which I binge when it gets in the house, its a miracle it lasts a month. Even Mrs Cerno has shown an officially denied weakness for it.

Mccurrie hasn’t paid me to write this post. I’m writing this to save the nation’s health. Purely out of the goodness of my clogged heart. Actually, if you don’t buy it, there’ll be more left for me.

caju-badum

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